Time to speak up….

Everyone has a story. Everyone should be heard. Let’s talk about mental health on World Mental Health Day 2019. Wherever you are, let’s help each other.

A.S.D Brooks

A.S.D Brooks in the European Union….

For your information, I’m not going to have a referendum!!! This is a matter of where my blog is being viewed today, namely UK, Belgium, Austria, Netherlands, Ireland, Cyprus, Germany and Denmark. No proroguing going on here, just good folk in those afore mentioned countries tuning in to any cogent thoughts I may have from time to time.

I vote remain!!! Ha ha!

A.S.D Brooks

Calmness amongst the turbulence…

Turbulent day weather wise here in London. Lashing rain showers, angry dark skies and a cold, strong wind. Autumn is here folks! While standing at the bus stop watching the leaves being blown about in various directions, I thought it was time to reflect.

Reflect on the turbulence that has tried to throw me completely off course in 2019. But here I still am, despite that. In the last month, I have felt much better and calmer, more relaxed and enjoying life again. I’ve had a great and revitalising holiday. I’ve enjoyed my volunteering stints and being involved once again with spreading the word on mental health. I’ve enjoyed the end of the cricket season, especially watching Essex, my home county, winning the County Championship and the T20 competitions in the space of a week.

It was good to see my CBT counsellor today and explained why I feel so different. Then I went out and about, in the not so glorious weather, bought a book and a warm jumper for winter and then had a bite of lunch.

I feel so good that I am really looking forward to umpiring indoor cricket tomorrow morning. I haven’t umpired indoors for a few years now but I’m looking forward to the challenge. I think back to that day on Praia Da Oura beach in Portugal when all the upset and stress ebbed away and into the vast expanse of the Atlantic Ocean. Amazing difference in that space of time.

Yep, looking forward to having a good and productive winter where I can get back to doing the things I enjoy, and that I can ignore the darkness and the cold of the season. It won’t be easy, but I’m ready for the challenge.

A.S.D Brooks

Farewell to a cricket legend…thanks for the memories Tres

This is Marcus Trescothick, former England and Somerset cricketer who retired from the game yesterday, aged 43.

Trescothick was a superb left handed opening batsman who reduced opposing bowlers to a quivering wreck. His aggressive approach garnered him a huge amount of success at the top level and he had a run of six years at the top of the England batting.

What secures Trescothick’s place as a legend in my eyes was his admission, around 2006, that he was suffering from anxiety and depression. He made it ok to talk about mental illness. His story is documented in his superb autobiography, Coming Back to Me, where his daily battles melted the hardest of hearts with it’s honesty and candour.

I remember watching Trescothick playing for Somerset, soon after his admission of mental illness, in a game versus Surrey at The Oval. He scored a great century and the crowd rose as one to applaud not only the innings, but the man as well. Trescothick comes over well on TV as a decent, honest, pleasant human being who gave great service to the game of cricket.

Yesterday, as my home county, Essex, were nearing the County Championship title at Taunton versus Somerset, Trescothick came on as a substitute on his valedictory farewell appearance. He was applauded all the way to the centre, was applauded all the way off and both sides honoured his superb contribution to the game of cricket. It’s something I believe that cricket does well, saying thank you and farewell to it’s great servants and heroes down the years.

But above all, Trescothick brought home the reality that sportsmen are not robots, but human beings with frailties and qualities. He made it ok for other cricketers like Mike Yardy, Andrew Flintoff, Monty Panesar, Sarah Taylor and Jonathan Trott to speak out about their private battles.

Marcus Trescothick, a true legend of cricket, goodbye and thanks for the memories, especially beating the Australians in 2005!!

A.S.D Brooks

First impressions and self marketing?

Not too bad it seems at the former, but not so good at the latter.

I’ll explain. Last week and today at two separate mental health events, two people came up to me and remembered me doing some public speaking at previous events. It seemed that these people enjoyed my presentations and I’m flattered by the comments.

But I’m not good at marketing myself, making people aware of what I can offer. Always hiding my light under a bushel, as it were. I let people approach me rather than being pushy and overbearing. Presentations have dried up a little in the last few months but now Autumn is here, it seems I’ve been invited to a few events, whether in a speaking or non speaking capacity.

So if you want me to tell you my mental health story and my daily battles with being autistic, then get in touch with me on the regular platforms, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. I would like to do more speaking on the subject as it’s something I feel comfortable doing. Hopefully this might happen as the year end approaches. Watch this space….

A.S.D Brooks

Week catching up with me…

It’s been an interesting and varied week. I’ve done some volunteering with SANE, some Peer Support work and watched my home county, Essex, win at cricket, so I’ve been out every day virtually.

I think today was when it all caught up with me. I was at another mental health event with Thrive LDN this time, in the London Bridge area. I had to be out early because as is typical of weekend travel in London, several rail lines were having engineering work done so I had to find an alternative route. Not so bad though this morning, and the walk to the venue was pleasant enough on another lovely Autumn day.

The first half of the session today was good, and I was reasonably fresh and alert, but for the second half, a combination of a hearty lunch and the week’s activities saw my concentration levels drop in what we euphemistically call the “post lunch dip”. Not at my best there. But I met some good people and I enjoyed the day.

Getting home was a trickier business as it took nearly 100 minutes to do an hour’s journey. So I was a touch irritable when I finally made it home. Tomorrow is a day when I can recharge and sleep a bit longer!

So not a bad Saturday but tired.

A.S.D Brooks

Scaling the heights……

Here’s where I was today:-

The Orbit structure at London’s Olympic Park. How did I end up here? Because a staff member at SANE, the UK mental health charity I volunteer for, asked me to support her in cheering on some employees from UK company Roche, who are one of SANE’s biggest fundraisers.

The employees did some abseiling from the very top of the structure, which is about 80-100 feet above ground. There were some very nervous people but they all said that they enjoyed the experience.

Me? Foolishly, I decided to take the lift up to the very top to watch the abseiling in action. One thing I didn’t consider – the speed of the lift. It zooms to the top in 34 seconds and it felt like a very long 34 seconds. I had a bit of a panic as the climb is very steep and the lift speed caught me very unawares. So I took the lift straight back down again! If I can’t even manage a lift, then there’s little chance of me abseiling. I’m ok with heights most of the time, except here!

Wonderful day. The weather was excellent and the company great. You would have to pay me a lot of money to do what the Roche employees did but it was all for a great cause, raising money for mental health awareness. September is rivalling March as one of my favourite months. And that was the first time I visited the Olympic Park. Next summer I shall pay a visit, because there’s plenty of green space, a river and opportunities for a walk and fresh air. And it’s only 8 miles from my area.

It’s been a good week so far. More soon….

A.S.D Brooks